Latest VR News
Home » Cardboard » Eclipse day brings science lesson to business and marketing class

Eclipse day brings science lesson to business and marketing class

Monday introduced the primary photo voltaic eclipse observable from coast-to-coast throughout the United States in 99 years, and the Columbus space was alongside the trail the place the Moon blocked 92 % of the Sun at 2:37 p.m., so this was a momentous second that prompted South Girard School business and marketing instructor Preston Pritchett to conduct a science lesson for his Phenix City eighth-graders throughout sixth interval.

Preston Pritchett, a 2009 graduate of Glenwood School, attended South Girard whereas rising up in Phenix City. He teaches the “Career Preparedness” elective at South Girard, however he’s the one South Girard instructor who was in a position to purchase a class set of licensed eclipse glasses earlier than they bought out.

“Even though this is a business-minded class, we really focus on real-life and real-world events and happenings,” Pritchett stated. “So the eclipse kind of falls into that category.”

Leading up to the eclipse, the class has mentioned how the celestial convergence affected corporations, faculties and different organizations.

“It seems like the eclipse is a science thing, not a business thing,” Pritchett stated, “but there are a lot of ways to relate this.”

Friday, to put together for the eclipse day, Pritchett’s sixth-period college students assembled Google Cardboard virtual reality headsets to view a video a few photo voltaic eclipse. Then they mentioned what they noticed and how they thought it will be comparable or totally different in contrast to what they might see Monday in individual. Tuesday, the scholars will write a abstract report about their eclipse expertise and could have the chance to share their report with the class.

Pritchett’s level: During a cosmic occasion, it doesn’t matter what topic you’re assigned; good academics capitalize on teachable moments.

“You absolutely want to take advantage of a unique experience like this,” he stated.

So on Monday, 21 of Pritchett’s 25 sixth-period college students have been in attendance, and all of them had signed permission from their mum or dad or guardian to view the eclipse in individual.

While he took attendance, the scholars wrote their solutions to the “bellringer” query Pritchett had posed, asking them to write 5 sentences incorporating their vocabulary phrases to describe what they anticipate to expertise in the course of the eclipse. One woman wrote, “I think the eclipse will be spectacular.”

At 2:20 p.m., 17 minutes earlier than the utmost eclipse, Pritchett handed out the eclipse glasses.

“Be very careful with the lenses,” he informed the scholars. “Don’t put these on until we go outside, because it’s like pitch-black when you put them on. … Once you step outside, I want you to keep these on until I tell you that you can take them off.”

In the grassy expanse outdoors their classroom, the wind picked up because the eclipse moved towards most and the sunshine dimmed, though a number of college students remarked they have been stunned how brilliant the day remained.

Their reactions ranged from blasé to amazed as the utmost eclipse of 92 % within the Columbus space arrived.

As he gazed on the eclipse, Brantley Laney, 13, stated it appeared like “a big crescent Happy Meal. … I hope the Moon’s not falling toward us.”

Brantley added, “I don’t know if I’ll ever see it again, so I’m glad to be able to come out here.”

Ansley Deaton, 13, stated, “It’s almost like in a smiley-face position. It’s very narrow, and you can only see a little bit of the sun.”

She was grateful to see the eclipse in individual.

“This is something I’ll always remember,” Ansley stated.

Pritchett used a drone to take photographs and video of his college students watching the eclipse. Seeing his college students’ smiles and listening to their oohs and aahs, he considers the lesson a hit.

“I’m just very thankful to have the chance to do this,” he stated. “It’s exciting to know that you get to share something with students that they will remember hopefully for the rest of their lives – and I’m pretty excited to see it myself.”


Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

*

x

Check Also

Racing’s in-play opportunity

This is a visitor contribution by Will Duff Gordon, CEO of Total Performance Data. If ...